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Degree having this Course

Degree - Branch Degree Plan Year
Engenharia Informática - Sem Ramos - Especialidades 2010/11
Nanoquímica e Nanomateriais - Sem Ramos - Especialidades 2012/13
Design de Media Interactivos - Sem Ramos - Especialidades 2010/11

Course Information

Course Objectivs


Synopsis: 
This course is an introduction tthe fundamentals of human computer interaction, user research, user interface design, and usability analysis. Students will learn principles and guidelines for usability, quantitative and
qualitative analysis methods, and apply them through critiques of existing interfaces and development of
new ones. Topics covered will also include cognitive models, task analysis, psychology, experimental design, and prototyping methods. 
 
The course will be conducted as a mix of lectures and seminar-style discussions. Lectures are expected to be dynamic and interactive. Besides active participation during class discussions, students are expected to participate in a team-oriented R&D project (see Projects).
(See also Course assignments and evaluation, below.)
 
Objectives:
Learn the fundamental principles and rules for the design and development of user interfaces. Identify the users and the tasks they wish to accomplish with the interactive system being developed. Know how to evaluate the interfaces at different stages of their development, applying the evaluation techniques that are most appropriate. Identify critical factors in interface design. Understand and adopt compromises between the various constraints to which interface design is subject, as framed within a computer engineering interface design project.
 
Approach:
Course activities include theoretical lectures and a parallel sequence of structured labs and studios for the application of knowledge and skills pertaining to human computer interaction and user-centered design
 
Students will complete three (3) assignments focused on evaluating a website, creating a low-fidelity prototype, and conducting a usability studyStudents will also complete a term-length group project, to be presented in the form of five (5) interim deliverables, including informal studio presentations and formal final oral presentation.
 
Raising questions and points for discussion in class is strongly encouraged by the lecturer. Students should come to each class having read the assigned material beforehand.
 
Acquired competencies:
 
It is anticipated that students who successfully complete the course will be capable of:
  • Understanding a typical product development lifecycle
  • Discovering user expectations & pain points
  • Balancing client/stakeholder?s expectations & prioritizing these with users? needs and goals
  • Identifying the users & tasks associated with the particular interactive system to be developed
  • Selecting and adapting appropriate user research methods to uncover user behaviors
  • Conducting a contextual inquiry
  • Distilling, organizing & communicating large amounts of information/data
  • Impartially evaluating & validating ideas/designs with users & stakeholders
  • Practicing sketching & prototyping early in the product development lifecycle
  • Critically discussing common user centered design methods and the appropriateness of each for solving a given problem
  • Identifying critical factors in interface design
  • Using, adapting and extending classic design standards, guidelines, and patterns
  • Designing & developing user interfaces
  • Selecting and executing the appropriate design methods and evaluation strategies at a basic level of competence
  • Taking design trade-offs into account throughout product development lifecycle (i.e. understanding and adopting compromises between the various constraints to which the interactive system is subject)
  • Producing and refining a series of iterative prototypes (from paper prototypes to functional, interactive medium-fidelity prototypes)
  • Evaluating interactive systems at different stages of their development, and determining the appropriate evaluation techniques to be applied
  • Creating usable & aesthetically pleasing assets and deliverables for clients
It is further expected that students will develop confidence in:
  • Verbal presentation skills, both in informal and formal contexts
  • Explaining a user centered design process
  • Describing design concepts & design decisions
  • Storytelling & writing skills
  • Articulating project goals 
  • Negotiating with clients & teammates

Evaluation Criteria

To receive a passing grade in this course, you must turn in all of the assignments and complete all project deliverables. You cannot pass this course without doing all of the assigned work. 
 
Bear in mind, however, that turning in all of the work is NOT a guarantee that you will pass the course.
Assignments (A1A2A3) submitted up to 48 hours after the deadline will be marked at 80%; assignments turned in 48-72 hours after the deadline will be marked at 70%; assignments submitted more than 72 hours after the deadline will not be marked. No late group project deliverables (D1, D2, D3, D4, D5) will be accepted.
 
Please note: All assignments/project deliverables requiring a written component must be typed, bearing the corresponding student name(s) and ID number(s), and submitted via email before the start of the corresponding class period. Students are expected to use proper citation and reference formatting (see The Elements of Style, by Strunk & White, or the APA Citation Style Guide on Cornell University?s website at http://www.library.cornell.edu/resrch/citmanage/apa). The final in-class presentation should be a professional delivery. 
 
Readings and online videos will typically be assigned for each lecture class period. Please be prepared to discuss the materials that are assigned. 
 
Class discussions are important, and all students are expected to participate. I expect you to come to class/lab prepared to contribute constructively to discussions, ask challenging questions, and help your classmates with in-class studios, labs, and other activities. At the end of the term, you are welcome to submit a 1-paragraph personal statement on how you contributed to the class. This statement is entirely optional and is due by the beginning of class on the day of the final project presentations.
 
CLASS/LAB+STUDIO PARTICIPATION - 10%

ASSIGNMENTS - 30%
3 * assignments
:

  A1 - Critique of a website (30% individualrespective due dates TBA

  A2 - Low-fidelity prototype (30% pairs) - due 23/03 & 24/03

  A3 - Usability study (40% pairs) - due 20/04 & 21/04

TERM-LENGTH PROJECT - 60%
4 interim deliverables + 1 final deliverable

  D1 - Project pitch (5% - individualdue 23/02 & 24/02

  D2 - Project plan
 (10% - group) - due 09/03 & 10/03

  D3 - Contextual inquiry (20% - group)
 - due 06/04 & 07/04

  D4 - 
Low-fi prototyping & evaluation + informal presentation (25% - group) - due 11/05 & 12/05

  D5 - Final system and evaluation + final oral presentation (40% - group) - due 01/06 & 02/06
  For D5, your team will be evaluated on: depth of analysis (33%), engaging, quality presentation
  (33%), and the quality and conceptual merit of your final prototype (33%).

Final oral presentations - per lab session - will respectively take place on 01/06 & 02/06.
Note: ALL students must be present and *on time*, i.e. seated and ready to give your full attention at the top of the hour! Late arrivers will be marked down.
 
Your final score for the class will then be adjusted to a scale of 0-20. 

Program Resume (get program detail)

Human Computer Interaction

Spring 2017
 
Lecturer:  Prof Dr Simone Ashby
Office:  Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute (M-ITI), Madeira Tecnopolo, -2, 1a
Email:  ashbyhanna@gmail.com
 
Office hours: by appointment (students must contact the lecturer by email, specifying the subject matter to be discussed, at least 24 hours prior to the appointment)
 
Note concerning email inquiries: Please use a subject line with the course identifier and your name. E.g.  HCI - Laura Silva
 
Course information (including the course syllabus, lecture notes, projects, reference materials, and information relating to project deliverables and assignments) will be maintained in the designated course Google site.
 
Synopsis: 
This course is an introduction tthe fundamentals of human computer interaction, user research, user interface design, and usability analysis. Students will learn principles and guidelines for usability, quantitative and qualitative analysis methods, and apply them through critiques of existing interfaces and development of new ones. Topics covered will also include cognitive models, task analysis, psychology, experimental design, and prototyping methods. 
 
The course will be conducted as a mix of lectures and seminar-style discussions. Lectures are expected to be dynamic and interactive. Besides active participation during class discussions, students are expected to participate in a team-oriented R&D project (see Projects).
(See also Course assignments and evaluation, below.)
 
Approach:
Course activities include theoretical lectures and a parallel sequence of structured labs and studios for the application of knowledge and skills pertaining to human computer interaction and user-centered design
 
Students will complete three (3) assignments focused on evaluating a website, creating a low-fidelity prototype, and conducting a usability studyStudents will also complete a term-length group project, to be presented in the form of five (5) interim deliverables, including informal studio presentations and formal final oral presentation.
 
Raising questions and points for discussion in class is strongly encouraged by the lecturer. Students should come to each class having read the assigned material beforehand.
 
Project Deliverables (see also Projects):
Unless otherwise indicated on the course schedule, each project group must email the lecturer a PDF copy of the required deliverable by EOD (end of day) on the corresponding lecture/lab date (see course schedule below). It is each student?s responsibility to make sure the project deliverable is complete.
 
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the project work performed and individual peer evaluations. 
 
Note that ?SLACKING?, i.e. not doing your individual share of the work, will not be tolerated and may result in a failing course grade. If there is a slacker on your team, please report him or her early in the semester so that the the individual can be approached and given proper guidance to contribute at the required standard. In cases where an individual team member did not contribute equally to the project, project grades will be individually weighted to account for uneven contribution levels. (Note: at the end of the term, each student will be required to complete and submit a confidential self- and peer-review survey.)
 
Academic dishonesty policy:
No plagiarism will be tolerated! Be sure to properly cite the source of your ideas to lend support and credibility to your work.
 
Any assignments or projects containing plagiarized work will receive a failing grade, i.e. zero ?0?. The same policy applies to any student caught sharing his or her work to be copied by another student. Depending on the circumstances (e.g. multiple offenses), such actions may additionally lead to failure of the course.
 
Readings: 
  • Readings will be assigned throughout the semester (consult the course schedule, below, and see theReading List). Note that these are required and not optional.
Materials:
  • 1-2 packages of multi-colored Post-it notes
  • 1 package of multi-colored dot stickers
  • marking pens (several colors)
  • paper (A3 or A4)
Course schedule (subject to change) at https://sites.google.com/site/hciatuma/syllabus
 

Main Bibliography

The list of assigned readings for this course is available at https://sites.google.com/site/hciatuma/my-reading-list.

Other Biographical Sources / Support Documents

Student Support

Associated Links

https://sites.google.com/site/hciatuma/

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